"While We Were Here" was the most visually satisfying movie I’ve seen in a while. Bored Kate Bosworth flits around being unsatisfied with her dull husband, and has an affair with the charming, mischievous 19-year-old she meets while on vacation in Italy: the story is ordinary, and apparent from the very first scene, when they show the married couple walking with their suitcases in a disjointed manner.  One of them keeps walking faster than the other, and when one stops to wait, the other one doesn’t notice and keeps walking.  Plots don’t always need to be terribly original if they’re well-executed; if they did, no one would be able to make love stories anymore.  I’ve only ever seen Bosworth in Blue Crush before, and I was surprised at the nuance in her performance.  There were moments when Bosworth took it a little too far with her damsel-in-distress routine, but she is supposed to be a writer.  I loved the inclusion of her grandmother’s insightful interviews about WW2 that she listens to on tape throughout the film.  The cinematography in Italy is truly breathtaking, and the movie is incredibly beautiful to watch.  I wanted to pause each scene and stare at the still of it.  

"While We Were Here" was the most visually satisfying movie I’ve seen in a while. Bored Kate Bosworth flits around being unsatisfied with her dull husband, and has an affair with the charming, mischievous 19-year-old she meets while on vacation in Italy: the story is ordinary, and apparent from the very first scene, when they show the married couple walking with their suitcases in a disjointed manner.  One of them keeps walking faster than the other, and when one stops to wait, the other one doesn’t notice and keeps walking.  Plots don’t always need to be terribly original if they’re well-executed; if they did, no one would be able to make love stories anymore.  I’ve only ever seen Bosworth in Blue Crush before, and I was surprised at the nuance in her performance.  There were moments when Bosworth took it a little too far with her damsel-in-distress routine, but she is supposed to be a writer.  I loved the inclusion of her grandmother’s insightful interviews about WW2 that she listens to on tape throughout the film.  The cinematography in Italy is truly breathtaking, and the movie is incredibly beautiful to watch.  I wanted to pause each scene and stare at the still of it.  

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